the humanity of it all [book]

understanding human body and organization parallels

Dr. Francescutti, along with five regarded experts, study the human body, its characteristics and behaviors, as well as the corporate body or organization, and its characteristics and behaviors—and the eerie and uncanny resemblance between the two—to empower readers to make better life and work decisions.

The book is currently under development, and an expected release date has yet to be determined.

---------- EXCERPT FROM THE BOOK ----------

Meet Steve. A thirty-one year old college graduate, Steve lives in a downtown apartment and drives a Toyota sports coup with a spoiler on the back. He’s a Sagittarius (not that it matters), and takes his personal appearance very seriously. He wakes early every morning to tune his physique with a six kilometer run beside the river, eats a banana and a bowl of low-fat cereal with Skim milk, and then follows it all up by lifting weights in the corporate gym during the lunch hour.

Despite having a movie-star appearance, Steve’s friends ridicule him constantly about his dating habits. Two parts jealousy and one part truth, they claim he has no problem hooking up with a ten-out-of-ten suitable mate, but refuses to settle in for a relationship that lasts longer than only a few weeks.

Steve took after his father when it came to his career. Son to a civil engineer and a stay-at-home mom, Steve and his three siblings lived in a middle-class home and had access to medical care, education, and their parents’ good genes.

A chemical engineer, Steve works hard to get noticed in DrugMed Inc., a large, international pharmaceutical corporation employing more than 20,000 workers in 6 countries.

Now, meet Roxanne. Forty-six years young, she is married, with two children, ages seven and ten. Both children attend school while Roxanne struggles to get her catering company off the ground while her husband works for the local municipality as a sanitation worker.

Delicious Dishes Inc. barely makes ends meet each month. The first three years were costly and unsustainable, and only now, the company’s perseverance with the local convention center is starting to pay off.

Roxanne suffers from Crones Disease. In fact, her main motivation to start her own company came from the desire to be free to attend to medical treatments and to support her school-aged children, but the business’s lagged success has not allowed her to realize this yet. Her health is not getting better, and day-by-day, she feels she is falling behind on her business, her family, and herself.

Roxanne’s husband, Jack, is a cancer-survivor, having battled testicular cancer sixteen years ago.

Roxanne and Jack experience a great amount of stress as a result, but do their best not to portray this to their friends and family.

We’ll be diving deeper into the lives and work of Steve and Roxanne, but ironically, this book is not about them. It’s about you.

In fact, there really is no Steve, and there really is no Roxanne. But here, they represent common individuals, trying to make their way through life stumbling upon common hurdles, just as you do. In fact, Steve and Roxanne are your neighbors, your co-workers, your son who lives in another city, or your mother who just celebrated her 67th birthday.

We’ll take a fascinating backstage tour of these individuals’ lives and learn how they’ve become who they are and what makes them tick (literally). From family genes to social influences, and medical conditions to deliberate factors, we’ll try to understand reasons why Jack was struck with cancer and Steve hasn’t been, and why Steve, surprisingly, may in fact have a lower life expectancy than Roxanne.

Then we’ll explore the companies our subjects work in and expose the striking and bold similarities between the human body and the corporate body. An almost eerie and uncanny resemblance, we’re provided with many clues to understand our living and working lives, and how to make choices that will benefit us the most—in terms of personal health, and personal wealth.